Should you consider a split custody schedule?

On Behalf of | Jun 15, 2022 | Child Custody |

You’ve always known that your children didn’t get along well, but with the onset of your divorce, things have gotten even worse. Your teen is outright intolerant of your younger child, but your younger child doesn’t understand what’s going on and has anxiety and frustrations themselves.

What can you do to make this situation more bearable? Would it be better to separate your children?

Split custody is an option for some siblings

There are times when split custody is a good idea for some siblings. For example, when there is sibling violence or the problem of constant arguments in the home, it may be a good idea to try to separate your children for a while to help them calm themselves and find balance again.

Here’s an example of how that might work

Imagine that you agree to have your teen live with the other parent from Monday through Friday. They can go to school and see their friends freely, and they won’t have to worry about their younger sibling being present when they do.

You may decide to have your younger child stay with you. You can spend the time focused on their schoolwork and helping them adjust to a quieter household. You might have them bring over their friends and let them enjoy their own age-appropriate activities.

Then, on the weekends, you and the other parent may set aside time for both children to be together. You might have your children spend one weekend with you and one with the other parent, for example. You could also alternate weeks, letting you and the other parent have equal time with both children.

Splitting custody isn’t always necessary, but it could be helpful

There are many kinds of visitation schedules and custody plans that help in numerous circumstances. If your children aren’t getting along right now and you think that their arguments are just making life harder for everyone, now might be a good time to consider a split custody schedule. In the future, you can always modify the schedule to give them more time together if they are able to have positive interactions.